Changing of the Seasons

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It has been a warm and dry fall until just recently, but the season has definitely begun to change.  The days are shorter and the nights are cool.  My outdoor activities have changed focus.  The trout pictured above are from my last fishing trip on the Cache la Poudre river a couple weeks ago.  Two were caught on a hopper dry fly and two were caught on a tiny #20 nymph dropper off of that large grasshopper dry fly. They will be smoked on the grill soon.  Fall has me switching time to hunting rather than fishing.  I didn’t draw a deer tag this year so I had to buy a leftover tag in an area I had never hunted before.  I went scouting there a few days before the season opened.  I didn’t see any deer and found some sign, including a couple fresh rubs which was important as I had a buck tag, but not near as much deer sign as I am used to seeing in my regular hunting area.  I carried my shotgun and did bring home a rabbit.

Opening day was predicted to be unseasonably warm, although it was plenty cold before sunrise, about 36 degrees.  There were several other cars parked at my spot when I arrived, letting me know there would be other hunters in the area. I was in place, before legal shooting time, watching those fresh rubs for the first couple of hours that morning.  I saw no deer, but did see several other hunters move through the area.  Before the day was through I would see 10 hunters, including a party of 5 that were hunting together. With no early activity around those rubs, I began exploring, still hunting and stopping to watch promising areas, taking time to sip coffee and eat some snacks while sitting.  I continued to see other hunters, but no deer and very little wildlife other than a couple rabbits and some birds.  At one point, while in deep woods I heard strange sounds from what had to be a flock of birds flying overhead.  I never did see them, but knew that sound.  It had to be a large flock of sandhill cranes.  That was confirmed when I heard from several friends later that day that they had seen large flocks migrating overhead along the Front Range.

By midafternoon I had seen no deer, but plenty of hunters.  I was beginning to think it might be wise to call it a day and come back after the weekend when there would likely be fewer hunters in the woods.  I had made a large loop through deep woods and was heading back in the direction of my car as I approached a large clearing.  Suddenly there were two deer, right on the edge of the clearing, no more than sixty feet away.  I looked at one through my scope and saw antlers.  They had seen me at this point so I quickly shifted my aim and shot.  That deer took off and disappeared from view.  The other ran a dozen feet and stopped to look at me again before taking off.  I ran forward and couldn’t find a blood trail where that deer had been standing.  I was sure I couldn’t have missed at that distance so I started a search.  I couldn’t find a trail in the direction he ran, but it only took a couple minutes of searching before I spotting him laying just inside the woods about seventy feet away from where he was shot.

I ran over and offered a prayer of thanksgiving to Mother Gaia for providing me with this bounty to feed my family. My circle of friends call this spiritmeat, and wild game meat is always treated with reverence.  After field dressing and bagging the liver to carry out to the cooler in the car, I hiked out to get my game cart.  I passed another hunter on the way.
When he saw me pulling my cart, he followed and asked if I would like some help.  This is common practice, even among hunters who have never met before and the help is always appreciated.  My first meal from this buck was fresh liver.

The garden is winding down and we covered it two nights ago from the first frost.  There are still a few tomatoes and lots of tomatillos and peppers still in the garden.  Our fall cool season crop has started adding lettuce, spinach and mustard greens as well as pea pods, shoots and leaves to our daily salads.  The flower pictured above is a toad lily.  We came across this while looking for plants to put in Cathy’s flower garden last spring.  We couldn’t resist pictures of the flower which described this as a fall blooming perennial.  The flowers are small, only a couple inches across, but is has been blooming prolifically for several weeks now.  We are still harvesting plenty of kale, rainbow chard, radish roots and greens, parsley, chives, carrots and basil from the garden for our salads and hope to continue picking salad greens for a while.

It has been a good year in the garden and our freezer is packed full.  Next weekend is elk season.  If I bring home a bull, we will need to either buy another freezer or trade some meat to a friend for some storage space.  The weather has been delightful with pleasant days, cool nights and we recently received some much needed rain.  It would be nice to get a little tracking snow in the high country where I will be elk hunting in a week.  Based on long range predictions, it may happen.  Knowing we have a plentiful supply of vegetables and venison in the freezer, the pressure may be off, but bringing home some elk meat would be a delightful bonus to this beautiful fall season.

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6 thoughts on “Changing of the Seasons

  1. Another beautifully written blog!! God bless you for following the blood trail! That is, indeed, spirit meat, as all meat should be. (I’m confused – was it a deer or a buck?) I’m amazed that you’re still harvesting into the coming frost! I ponder suggesting growing some Indica for good sleep – just need a special license. I bet you can grow anything beautifully, and I love reading about it!
    🙂 (PS: “it has been blooming prolifically” – curse of editing eye.) No wonder you’re in such great shape! Hunting is a lot of exercise and patience, and I do love humane meat sourcing. 🙂 Happy elk hunting!

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  2. oops – didn’t mean blood trail since there wasn’t one – meant God bless you for finding that sweet animal so it didn’t die a slow death! They get so scared when it isn’t a quick kill. 😦

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      • Good! 30 seconds is almost instant! I knew a buck was a male – got confused about which license you got. 🙂

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      • Hi! I’m saving this way of emailing you so I don’t post editing comments. (Or Indica comments for that matter. Can always get you an edible if you’d like to try it for sleep.) I can’t help seeing stuff that I think you’d like to know – two writing degrees = curse of editing eye. :-}

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  3. Hi Richard! Just a note to say I’m un-following because I’m not online anymore, except for my involvement with ATPF (Association for Truth about Pet Food), and even that passion gets limited time. I know as a writer, you grok the desire to go within, tune out the world and just write. I’m so impressed that you can do both writing and social media – been there, done that – not for me, not yet anyway. So happy writing and I’ll be doing the same! 🙂 I’m working on an article for the Denver Post (for ATPF) along with three books, and it’s wonderful and joyful to hold that focus of raising awareness for animals.

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